FEAR IN DOGS

Understanding Fear in Dogs

By Linda J. Brodzik

Fear and fear related behaviors displayed by companion dogs are the most common behavior concerns I work with. Fear in dogs can be mild and seemingly insignificant, or extreme, causing great disruption to comfort, security and quality of life for both dogs and their owners. What dogs are fearful of can range greatly. Dogs can develop fear of a particular person or a general type of person (such as men or children), noises, objects, places, situations (such as being approached by people or other dogs, physically handled, groomed or examined by a veterinarian), or dogs can be afflicted with a general fear of anything or anyone new or unusual it encounters.
How Dogs Act On Fear
When in a fearful state dogs can react in one of four ways. They can take flight and move away, increasing distance between them and the fear provoking situation. This is what most people associate and expect to see in a fearful situation. A second response to fear includes freezing and become motionless. A third way that dogs may display fear is through fidgeting behaviors such as sniffing about, scratching, eating or drinking water rapidly, or frenetic play with a toy or other object.
The fourth and most concerning manner in which a dog may act on a fear provoking situation is through aggressive behaviors. Owners often have difficult y in acknowledging this as a response to fear as the dog is acting outwardly and offensively. But we must realize that aggressive behaviors are displayed in a response to a perceived threat. The dog is, in actuality, displaying aggressive behaviors as a means of increasing spatial distance between itself and the threatening stimuli, whether it be a person, dog or other fear invoking situation.
Physical Displays of Fear
Just as there are differing ways that dogs can react when faced with a fear provoking situation there are also differing ways that dogs display fear physically. Dogs clearly display their concern and fearful state through body signals/language, although many people are not familiar with these signs and often misinterpret them. Common signals include a lowered body stance, crouching or laying belly up, tail tucked, tail wagging in a quick, frenetic manner, head lowering, looking away or turning the head away, large “whale eye” with white showing, ears flattened against the head, lips pulled tightly back, or becoming piloerect (hair raised) which is often associated with aggression but more correctly signifies a state of arousal.
Causes of Fear
There are three basic causes of fear in dogs. Fearful tendencies in dogs can have a single cause or be combination of the causes.
The first cause of fear is genetics. Some dogs are born with a lower tolerance to stressors and anxiety provoking situations. Parents who have a weaker tolerance to stress and are prone to fearful responses are likely to produce offspring of the same.
The second cause of fear is the lack of proper socialization during critical socialization periods. Puppies progress through learning and development stages just as human children do. By exposing our dogs to different kinds of people, animals and environments we can help them develop confidence and ease. This goes a long way in helping them become resilient in the face of unsettling situations. However it must be stated that just exposing a puppy to different people, places, objects, noises and situations in not good enough. It is how a puppy is socialized that makes the difference. Socialization should never be forced but instead approached systematically and in a manner that build confidence and curious interaction. Socialization is not just for puppies. While the foundation for social and trusting behavior is learned in the first months of life it is important to continue to be conscious of social behavior and social exposure throughout a dog’s life.
The third cause of fear is that the dog has experienced a specific situation that provoked a fearful response. My dog, Elsa is fearful of other dogs approaching her because she has been attacked by other dogs approaching her on several occasions. I met with a cocker spaniel who was fearful and aggressive towards anyone wearing brown shoes. His previous owner wore brown shoes as he would kick this poor dog around the house and down the basement stairs.
Fears can spread by association. Some time ago I met with a golden retriever who suddenly became aggressive to the children he played with daily. As the owner was teaching his dog to come he employed the use of an electric shock collar. He often worked on calling the dog to come as the dog was playing with neighboring children. The dog soon learned to associate the pain of the electric shock with children. Now the dog is fearful and aggressive when children approach.
Treating Fear
When working with dogs who suffer from fear it is important to build upon the dogs coping skills and ability to succeed. The better the dogs coping skills such as self calming, self control, self boundary setting, and emotional control, as well as a trusting and eager attention to the owners’ guidance and teaching, can lessen fear responses as they give the dog alternate responses to the socially ill working responses.
It is important to acknowledge that although pet owners are concerned with the behaviors associated with fear, whether it be aggressive or flight oriented, it is the emotional state of fear that manifests the concerning behaviors. This brings importance to understanding the emotional base to the behaviors and specifically working to lessen the dog’s emotional reaction to the fear provoking situation as well as building better and more socially productive behavior patterns in the presence of the threat. Aversive, punitive or aggressive methods should never be used when working with fearful dogs, or behaviors manifesting from fear. This will only work to create more fear and distrust and certainly will do nothing to build confidence and trust in the associated situation.
When treating a fearful dog;
1. Increase both mental and physical exercise. Exercise expends energy, helps release endorphins into the brain and supports mental health. A full hour a day is a good start.
2. Establish good structure and boundaries within the home environment as well as communication directed towards the dog. This should be approached in a positive and supportive manner that builds upon the dog’s confidence and ability to succeed and gives support through predictability and consistency.
3. Engage in training, such as basic or advanced obedience, trick or agility. This can build ability, trusting attention and confidence. It also builds upon the dog’s repertoire of behaviors that can be used to replace ill behaviors displayed in fear provoking situations. Training should always be based in positive reinforcement as this builds confidence, ability and a trusting emotional state. As stated earlier in this article aversive, punitive or aggressive methods should never be used as these methods will increase anxiety and distrust and will build upon the dog’s fearful emotional state.
Dogs who are trained through properly taught Operant Conditioning based in positive reinforcement using an acoustic marker (this is the method used to train exotic animals such as whales, dolphins, and other creatures seen in animal shows) will learn quicker, build desire to learn as well as develop trust and a joyful emotional state in conjunction with behaviors and situations that are associated with this methodology.
Consult with a qualified behavior specialist for guidance in using these training methods;
1. Classical Conditioning (Counter Conditioning & Systematic Desensitation)
2. Behavior Adjustment Training
3. Classically Conditioning via Operant conditioning.
These methods used independently or in conjunction with each other offer a positive and reliable approach to rehabilitating fearful behaviors displayed by dogs. For best results it is best to work in conjunction with a well qualified, educated and experienced behavior specialist.

Posted in Facts

Dog and Cat Limits

City Number of Animals Allowed per Household License Needed for: Where to Purchase
Apple Valley
952-953-2700 3 dogs, need license for more
3 cats Dogs Police Department

Bloomington
952-948-3942 4 animals,
any combination Dogs
Cats City Hall

Burnsville
952-894-3647 2 dogs*
5 cats*
*For 3-5 dogs, need
residential kennel license;
for 6+ cats, need
kennel license.
For kennel license:
· Rabies vaccination
· City license
· $50 annual fee Dogs
Cats
Ferrets Animal Control or Police Department

Cottage Grove
651-458-2850 No limit Dogs
Cats City Hall

Eagan
651-681-4700 3 animals Dogs Police Department or Eagan vet clinics
Eden Prairie
952-949-6200 2 Dogs
2 Cats
Kennel license for more Dogs City Hall

Farmington
952-894-9065 Cats – no restrictions
5 Dogs Dogs
Cats City Hall

Hastings
651-437-4127 2 Animals Dogs City Hall

Inver Grove Heights
651-450-2725 3 Dogs
No limit on cats Dogs City Hall

Lakeville
952-985-4800 3 Dogs
10 Birds
No ordinance on cats Dogs City Hall
Dakota Pet Hospital
Apple Lake Animal Hospital

Mendota Heights
651-452-1366 2 Animals Dogs City Hall
Minneapolis
612-348-4250 3 Dogs
(more with permit)
3 Cats Dogs Animal Humane Society
By mail
Veterinary clinics

Newport
651-439-9381 3 Animals Dogs City Hall

North St Paul
651-770-4450 3 Animals,
kennel permit for more Dogs City Hall

Prior Lake
952-440-355
5952-445-3156 3 Dogs or Cats,
kennel license for more Dogs
Cats City Hall

Richfield
612-861-9800 6 maximum,
3 or more need kennel license Dogs
Cats City Hall

Rosemount
651-423-4491 3 Cats
3 Dogs
Kennel license if more Dogs
Cats Police Department

St Paul
651-645-3953 3 Dogs and/or 3 Cats
(not 4 dogs & 2 cats) Dogs – license & rabies tag
Cats – rabies tag Animal Control
Some vets
License Office at
350 St Peter St

Savage
952-894-9065 4 Dogs
5 Cats
Kennel license for more Dogs Gentle Doctor Vet
Savage Tower Animal Hospital
City Hall

Shakopee
952-445-3156 5 Dogs and Cats total Dogs City Hall

South St Paul
651-554-3300 6 months or older, not
more than 1 dog per
2000/square feet
Cats – unknown Dogs
Cats City Clerks’ Office

West St Paul
651-450-1111 2 Dogs
2 Cats Dogs City Hall

Woodbury
651-439-9381 3 animals,
any combination Dogs Police Department

Posted in Facts | Leave a comment

Shots and Vet care for dogs

General Health Procedures-Dogs and Puppies

Congratulations on your new dog or puppy! It is always a good idea to take your adopted pet to see your veterinarian within a few days of you adopting them. Many vets will offer a free vet check when you adopt from a rescue agency, so make sure to ask them when you make the appointment! All of our animals are up to date on their vaccinations; however being adopted can be a very stressful time. Bringing your pet to the vet right away allows you and your new pet to establish a good relationship with your veterinarian. This also allows your veterinarian to enter your and your pet’s information into their computer system, most vets will send out a reminder card when your pet is due for vaccines.

Mothers pass on immunities to their babies while nursing, however depending on the mother’s health, vaccine history, and the babies’ immunities, the passed on immunities wear off in the babies sometime between 9 weeks and 16 weeks. This is why puppies need so many shots when they are young. Below is a generic schedule for vaccinating your dog throughout their life.

6 weeks: distemper combo

9 weeks: distemper combo

12 weeks: distemper combo, bordatella, Lyme

16 weeks: distemper combo, bordatella, Lyme, rabies, heartworm preventative

1 year: distemper combo, bordatella, Lyme, rabies, heartworm test, heartworm preventative

Every year after: Exam, heartworm test, heartworm preventative, and vaccines (see note below)

After age 7 years: Same yearly as listed above and blood work

A distemper combo can consist of: distemper, hepatitis, parainfluenza, parvovirus, leptospirosis, and corona. The combo given may vary slightly based on the kind of dog you have as some breeds are more prone to some diseases than others. You veterinarian will select the best fit for your dog.

Puppies under 1 year also commonly have intestinal parasites which cause diarrhea, vomiting, lethargy, and even anemia. Most puppies will get a routine de-wormer; however most vets will recommend a fecal test to see if they have any more parasites.

After 1 year of age, depending on the city in, the kind of vaccine your vet uses, and your dog’s exposure, the 1 year vaccines will be repeated somewhere between every 1-3 years. Heartworm tests and exams are still highly recommended each year.

Rabies is given every 2-3 years after the first intial one.

Once your dog is 7 years old vets will often recommend geriatric testing for liver and kidney functions.

Posted in My new dog or pup

How to clean Urine

ow To Clean Cat Urine – Home Remedies And Commercial Products
By Carole Nickerson

Anyone who has ever owned a cat has likely had the experience of stepping in a cold puddle of urine on the floor at least once. When it’s on linoleum or another washable surface, it’s not so bad, but when it starts happening on carpet and rugs – then you’ve got a real problem. Urine can soak down deep and the smell can linger for months if not cleaned properly. Cats tend to go back to the same area they’ve urinated before, and even when we think the smell is gone, a cat’s nose knows exactly where to do the dirty deed again.

Most people think that cat urine is worse than other types of animal urine, but there really isn’t much difference. The problem is that it tends to not be noticed right away or cleaned up thoroughly, giving bacteria a chance to grow, producing the funky ammonia smell. The longer it sits, the worse it gets. The other problem is that it tends to seep down below the carpet into the floorboards where you have no hope of getting to it without pulling the carpet back. Not very practical if the cat has urinated in the middle of the room.

Why cats choose to urinate outside the litterbox varies and can be complicated. If your cat is doing it frequently, you will want to consider the reasons behind the behaviour and ways you can prevent future accidents. Here are some common reasons why cats urinate in the wrong spots:

– Litter Box Problems. The litter box might be too dirty for the cat or has a cover which is keeping odors trapped. You might think the litter box is just fine, but a cat’s sense of smell is far more sensitive than our own. As well, your cat may have an issue with litter box privacy. Cats can be fussy about the amount of privacy they have when relieving themselves, especially if they have to share the litter box with other cats.

– Marking territory and dominance. Some cats like to urinate in key areas as a way to say “This is my turf, just so you know…” This is especially true of cats which have not been spayed or neutered. There’s nothing worse than a male cat “spraying” on furniture, the door, and everything else he feels needs to be marked with the scent of his virility.

– Unfamiliar new objects or smells. Some people believe that a cat will urinate in the wrong spot out of spite or jealousy. To a cat, strange new items with strange odors like baby blankets, jackets, and shoes are perceived as the presence of an intruder, and so the cat may feel they need to remind that they are king (or queen) of the house.

– Anxiety, Stress and other behavioural problems. Some cats seem to have a lot of emotional baggage, especially if they have a history of being abused or still being abused either physically or verbally. These types of problems require special care.

– Health problems. Older and sick cats may have some health problems you’re not aware of that require a vet’s attention. Frequent urination, especially in the presence of other symptoms, should always be investigated.

Cleaning cat urine effectively depends on many factors such as where it’s located, how long it was left unnoticed, and the type of surface it was deposited on. The most recommended products on the market contain enzymes which cause a chemical reaction with the urine to make it easier to clean. They break down the urine and neutralize the odor. The best approach is to take a rag or paper towels and soak up as much urine as possible first by firmly pressing on the area, repeating until you’ve absorbed as much urine as possible. A small carpet steamer can be helpful in sucking the urine from the carpet. If using a commercial product to clean the cat urine, it is best to follow the intructions on the bottle from that point as each have their own properties and strengths. Some products which have received good reviews include: “Kids ‘n’ Pets Brand Stain & Odor Remover” and “Just for Cats by Nature’s Miracle”.

There are few truly effective home remedies that work well in removing cat urine odors and stains. What seems to work for one person doesn’t work for another. Perhaps this is because different urine-soaked surfaces require different methods or solutions. Most people try dozens of things before finding something that does the job and agree that bleach, perfume-based products, and ammonia-based products do not work and likely to make the problem worse.

Here are a few home remedies that some people have found useful:

Vinegar and Baking Soda – First soak up as much of the urine as you can, then soak the area with a mixture of 1/3 cup of white vinegar with 2/3 cup of water and a little soap. With a clean rag, soak up any excess liquid pressing firmly and repeatedly until dry. Repeat this process using fresh water, and then use another rag to soak up the remaining liquid. After this, sprinkle some baking soda on the area and vaccuum up in 24 hours.

Peroxide – Some people claim peroxide works well in cleaning up cat urine and stains, though this can be tricky on surfaces which might discolor easily. Supposedly, peroxide breaks down the components in the cat urine which cause stains and odor. Pour a small amount directly on the area and allow to dry. Then rinse with warm water and soak up with a rag or paper towel.

Listerine Mouthwash – A number of people claim this helps eliminate cat urine odors when a few drops are added to your water & vinegar solution, or when mixed with a peroxide solution. It can also be mixed with just hot water and dabbed on the area. Most likely this is because of the amount of alcohol in Listerine.

As you can see, the issue of cleaning cat urine is complicated and there are no easy answers or quick fixes. You must be willing to consistently balance preventative measures with adequate cleaning methods and simply hope that your efforts will resolve the problem with time and persistence.

On Fri, May 22, 2009 at 7:21 PM, Angela Stefani wrote:

As you know about being a foster of dogs, they never never have poop or pee accidents, right? LOL!!
If you are the rare foster and that happens to you, heres some tips:

Miracle stuff is great ( knock offs at petsmart are fine too!) they are the ensymes that kill bacteria. Works on carpet, rugs, couches.

For floors, use 1/2 white vinegar and 1/2 water. Do not use amonia on floors or windows. Use white vinegar and water to clean smears on windows too. It works great!

For diarrhea or puke stains, we discovered that the best way to get them out is with Spray and Wash “Dual Power”.
It’s for tough laundry stains, but it takes the stains out of the carpet like magic.

Try Spotshot and Odo-Ban.

Oxy Clean has worked wonders too!

Posted in Facts

Where can I live with my pet anywhere in the country?

There is no reason you cannot take your dog or cat with you..

As per the Humane Society of the United States , the local Humane Societies mentioned in this section below all have lists of pet-friendly apartment communities in their areas, and may have complete information packets

NATIONAL Apartment Locators
http://www.apartmentguide.com
http://www.apartments.com
http://www.dogfriendly.com
http://www.forrent.com
http://www.homewithpets.com
http://www.101apartments.com
http://www.onlineapartmentguide.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.petapartments.net
http://www.petrent.net
http://www.petswelcome.com
http://www.rent.net
http://www.rentnet.com
http://www.simplerent.com

STATE Apartment Locators
ALABAMA
http://www.colonialprop.com

ARIZONA
http://www.bigdogs.net
http://www.petapartments.com
Phoenix
http://www.metroapts.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.petrent.net
http://www.petsrwelcome.com
http://www.phoenixapartmentfinder.com
http://www.rent.com
Tucson
http://www.metroapts.com

CALIFORNIA
http://www.metroapts.com
Berkeley
http://www.metrorent.com
Los Angeles County
http://www.fidofriendly.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
Los Angeles and San Fernando Valley
http://www.bestrents.com
http://www.freelists.com
hometown.aol.com/petsokla/myhomepage/news.html
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.pets-people.com
http://www.petrent.net
http://www.petsrwelcome.com
http://www.petswelcome.com
Orange County
http://www.fidofriendly.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
Riverside County
http://www.fidofriendly.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
Sacramento
http://www.petrent.net
San Bernardino County
http://www.fidofriendly.com
San Diego
http://www.freelists.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.pet-friendly-rentals.com
http://www.petrent.net
http://www.petsrwelcome.com
http://www.sandiegoapartments.com
http://www.SanDiegoForRent.com
http://www.sandiegopets.us
San Francisco Bay Area
Marin Humane Society; call 415-883-4621 for a housing packet
http://www.metrorent.com
Peninsula Humane Society: 650-340-7022, ext. 344 for a housing packet
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.petsrwelcome.com
http://www.Renttech.com
San Francisco SPCA
http://www.sfrent.net/
San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Gatos, Santa Clara, Mountain View, Sunnyvale and Palo Alto
http://www.metrorent.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
San Mateo County and Palo Alto
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
Santa Clara County, Fremont, and Redwood City
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
Santa Clara Valley Humane Society
Ventura County
http://www.fidofriendly.com

COLORADO
Boulder
http://www.housinghelpers.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
Colorado Springs
http://www.housinghelpers.com
Denver
http://www.afi.net/
http://www.asag.com
Dumb Friends League
http://www.denverpetapartments.com
http://www.housinghelpers.com
http://www.metroapts.com
http://www.petrent.net
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.rent.com
Ft. Collins
http://www.housinghelpers.com

CONNECTICUT
http://www.homeproperties.com

DELAWARE
http://www.homeproperties.com

FLORIDA
http://www.colonialprop.com
http://www.homewithpetsflorida.com

GEORGIA
http://www.colonialprop.com
Atlanta
http://www.atlantapartmentfinder.com
http://www.atlantapetapartments.com
http://www.freeapartmentlocators.com
http://www.metroapts.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.petsrwelcome.com

HAWAII
Honolulu
Hawaiian Humane Society: 808-946-2187

ILLINOIS
http://www.homeproperties.com
Chicago
http://www.apartmentdog.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.petrent.net
http://www.petsrwelcome.com
http://www.relconapartments.com
http://www.rentersonly.net

INDIANA
http://www.homeproperties.com

KANSAS
Kansas City
http://www.kcpremierapts.com

LOUISIANA
http://www.colonialprop.com

MARYLAND
http://www.homeproperties.com
http://www.metropets.org
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.relocationcentral.com

MASSACHUSETTS
Massachusetts SPCA: call 617-522-7400
Boston
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.petrent.net
http://www.petsrwelcome.com
Stoughton
http://www.homeproperties.com
Waltham
http://www.homeproperties.com

MICHIGAN
Farmington Hills
http://www.homeproperties.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com

MINNESOTA
http://www.housinglink.org
http://www.mynewplace.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com

MISSISSIPPI
http://www.colonialprop.com

MISSOURI
Kansas City
http://www.kcpremierapts.com
St. Louis
http://www.metroanimal.org

NEVADA
Las Vegas
http://www.housinghelpers.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.petrent.net
http://www.petsrwelcome.com
http://www.rent.com

NEW JERSEY
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.petsrwelcome.com

NEW YORK
http://www.homeproperties.com
http://www.petsrwelcome.com
NEW YORK CITY
http://www.newyorktails.com
http://www.petrent.net
http://www.rent-direct.com
http://www.allpetproperty.com
*DHCR (Division of Housing & Community Renewal) 212-240-6010
EVICTION INTERVENTION SERVICES ( Manhattan Housing Only) 150 E 62 212-308-2210
They try to prevent Homelessness: Legal Aid, Assistance with Grants, Loans, Court
Appearances, Tenants Rights to Maintenance/Repair, Apt Sharing Services, Legal Clinics, Etc.
(NYS DEPT OF) HOUSING: 212-240-6000
HRA INFO & n bsp; 718-291-1900
INSTITUTE FOR COMMUNITY LIVING 234 Atlantic Ave , Bklyn 718-272-6158
LENOX HILL NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOC 331 E 70 212-744-5022
SR CITIZEN CTR: 341 E 70 212-744-5905
REAL ESTATE COMPANIES with Pro-Animal owners: (For Multi-Pet Owners)
DOLORES BUONOCORE REALTY: Broker: Patricia Hanson 718-349-2525
KLEIN REALTY: Brokers: Sandy , Sal,Grete 718-384-9200
BO REALTY: Realtor: Bozana 718-389-1155
(Office of) RENT ADMINISTRATION RENT HOTLINE:DHCR: 718-739-6400
Roy Solomon: VERY HELPFUL, VERY NICE *Ricardo Capo de Villa
RENT GUIDELINES BOARD (This Is A Landlord-Funded Group/Ally) 212-349-2262
LANDLORDS THAT GENERALLY ALLOW PETS:
WINDSOR PLACE CORP (Hundreds of Buildings in NYC) 3rd Floor, 640 5th Ave , 10019 212-265-2280
Albany
http://www.aptspotlight.com
Buffalo
http://www.aptspotlight.com
Niagara Falls
http://www.aptspotlight.com
Rochester and Monroe County
http://www.aptspotlight.com
Humane Society of Rochester and Monroe County at Lollypop Farm
Upstate New York
http://www.aptspotlight.com

NORTH CAROLINA
http://www.colonialprop.com

OHIO
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
Columbus
http://www.homeproperties.com

OKLAHOMA
Tulsa
http://www.apartments-tulsa.net
http://www.tulsaapartmentlocator.com

OREGON
Portland
http://www.petrent.net

PENNSYVANIA
http://www.homeproperties.com
Philadelphia
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.petsrwelcome.com

RHODE ISLAND
Providence
http://www.petrent.net

SOUTH CAROLINA
http://www.colonialprop.com

TEXAS
http://www.apartmentlocators.com
http://www.colonialprop.com
http://www.rent.com
Austin
http://www.aplusapartments.com
http://www.austinapartmentfinder.com
http://www.austinapartmentkey.com
http://www.findaustinapartments.com
Corpus Christi
http://www.members.tripod.com/~leaseit
Dallas
http://www.aokapartmentlocators.com
http://www.aptfinders.net
http://www.bigdapartments.com
http://www.dallasapartments.com
http://www.dallasapartmentsatoz.com
http://www.dallas-locator.com
http://www.dfwapartmentguide.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.umovefree.com
Ft. Worth
http://www.fort-worthapartments.com
Houston
http://www.apartmentrefunds.com
http://www.houstonlocators.com
http://www.on-lineapartments.com
http://www.umovefree.com
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
San Antonio
http://www.san-antonio-apartment.com

TENNESSEE
http://www.colonialprop.com

VIRGINIA
http://www.homeproperties.com
http://www.metropets.org
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.relocationcentral.com
http://www.rentalhousing.com

WASHINGTON
Seattle, King, Snohomish, and Pierce Counties
http://www.metroapts.com
http://www.paws.org/shelter/services/aptguide
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.petrent.net
http://www.renttech.com
http://www.seattle.petapartments.com

WASHINGTON, DC
http://www.homeproperties.com
http://www.metropets.org
http://www.peoplewithpets.com
http://www.petsrwelcome.com
http://www.relocationcentral.com

Policies for fostering dogs or pups

All your own dogs must be spayed or neutered, current with DHPP, Bordatella and heartworm negative. Rabies is required by your city!

You are currently not over the city limit for the number of dogs you own. You can foster up to 1-2 more dogs past the city limit or a complete litter up to 12 with a mom. Exemptions are made for country homes that do not have city limitations or those with kennel licenses.

You have your own transportation to and from the vet clinics and pet adoption days within Inver Grove Hgts, Burnsville, Apple Valley and Farmington area

You must be able to come with your foster dog(s) to 2 at least 2-3 adoption days on Saturdays every month in this transportation area from 10:45 to 3:15 where almost all the training takes place.

All adults that live with you must agree to foster.

You must be 18 or over and all unrelated adults, such as roommates, must carry health insurance . You will sign a waiver to hold harmless Last Hope and any of the Stores that we attend from liability if your dog scratches or nips you..

You do not hit, spank or yank dogs but only use No or Bad dog when training a dog.

You are willing to say goodbye and then say hello over and over again so that more dogs and pups can find homes.

You DO NOT have to have a fenced in yard.

Posted in What is Fostering All About? | Leave a comment

How long will the dog take to adjust to us and us to the dog????

Three Ways to Confuse a New Dog
June 9, 2014
Three days, three weeks, three months.” That’s the mantra of many dog trainers and behaviorists, when welcoming a new dog into their household. The “magic of threes” is especially relevant when adopting an adolescent or adult dog into your home. Dogs, especially non-puppies, are often in a bit of shock for the first three days in a new home, and don’t show you too much about who they are until they’ve been there a few days. After three weeks many dogs have settled in such that they behave as though they feel like they are “home” now, but don’t fit into your routine until about three months have gone by. The number three has another relevance to new dogs: See below for the three ways we most confuse new dogs, and how to prevent it.
I’ve thought about this a lot lately, for a couple of reasons. First, it is the three-year anniversary of Love Has No Age Limit: Welcoming an Adopted Dog into Your Home. I co-authored the book with Dr. Karen London, a great behaviorist and author in her own right. She shared my experience of seeing multitudes of people who had gotten an older dog, often from a shelter or rescue, and were struggling with the transition. We wanted to write a concise but thorough booklet to help adopters, and make it priced so that shelters and rescues could hand it out to everyone. The book’s success has been beyond our expectations (it’s sold over 40,000 copies so far) and makes us both all oxytocin-y inside.
In honor of the book’s three year anniversary, we’re offering a “Buy One, Get Another One Free” sale. The hope is that dog lovers will buy one for themselves or a friend, and then donate the free one to their favorite shelter or rescue group.
The second reason I’ve thought about this lately is that our new dog Maggie is coming up on her three-month anniversary here. And just like clock-work, last night I asked Jim if he had noticed how well Maggie has settled in. Everything is so much easier now, for all of us. She knows the routine and has adjusted her biological clock to it. She has learned a lot about what is chewable and what isn’t, where to go potty, how to tell me if she’s desperate to go, and has worked out a great relationship with Willie. She has a great deal to learn, lots and lots, but it almost feels like we can all breathe a big sigh of relief now that we’ve hit the three month marker.
The exact same thing happened with our Cavalier, Tootsie, when we adopted her a few years ago. Tootsie, having been rescued from a puppy mill, had little idea about where to potty, to come when called, or to do much of anything on cue. I think it took a full year for her to totally settle in (I think it takes most dogs at least that long) but the three-month marker was a big one for us.
In celebration of the magic of threes, here are three biggest mistakes people make when adopting an adolescent or adult dog:
One: “Oh, good, he’s house trained.” Not in your house he isn’t! Dogs don’t necessarily generalize from one place to another until they’ve had a lot of experience in different places, so treat your three-year old dog like a puppy for the first few weeks. That took three weeks with Maggie and three months with Tootsie, who learned to potty where she ate and slept while confined to a cage in a puppy mill.
Two: “We’ll have everyone over to socialize him!” (Variant: “We’ll take him to training class tomorrow night!”) Your new dog didn’t spend weeks or months deciding to move to a new place, so he or she is probably in a bit of shock. New dogs need quiet time to adjust to their new surroundings, so go easy on the visitors or the new experiences for awhile. Remember that your new house is as big a “new experience” as is possible.
Three: “Oh No! We’ve had him two weeks already and now there’s a behavioral problem!” It’s true that some behavioral problems are so serious that they can’t be treated, but it is much (MUCH) more common that whatever is going on will be resolved with some simple training, patience, and yes, faith. I know well what it feels like to have “adopter’s remorse,” even with my background there have been moments I asked myself what the heck I was thinking after Tootsie and Maggie came. But all dogs, just like all people, need time and good coaching to be the best they can be. Most problems are fixable, so it’s okay to take a breath and think through the solution. Most importantly: Think long term, as in, it is going to take three months for my new dog to begin to settle in, and a full year for that to happen completely.
– See more at: http://www.patriciamcconnell.com/theotherendoftheleash/three-ways-to-confuse-a-new-dog#sthash.3wZQk7pZ.dpuf

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